Bibliophile Problems

If you couldn’t tell from my previous posts, I’m a book girl. There are a lot of books in my house. I’m talking more than dozens, more than hundreds, probably a couple thousand. I’ve never counted them all—that would mean math, and me and numbers don’t always get along.

This afternoon, after answering yet another a post on a homeschool page for recommendations for books set in a specific time period (happens regularly, and as a children’s literature connoisseur with a passion for historicals, I have to respond.) This time, it was a call for Civil War books. So, after going to my “favorite author” shelf in the hall, I returned to my desk area to look over my general middle grade collection for more titles. But then I remembered my middle child’s quest for all things military, and that I’ve allowed him to adopt many of my middle grade novels dealing with war, so I had to go check the bookcase in his room.

I circled all around the house to gather information I could have grouped together. What’s a bibliophile to do?

Book project! 100_6855

I’m seriously contemplating putting all my books in chronological order. Even though that would mean splitting up the Katherine Paterson, Avi, Richard Peck, and Laurie Halse Anderson novels, I think at this point in my life (hello, homeschool!) it would be beneficial. But then I’d have to worry about the fantasy, science fiction, and contemporary… where would they all fit? Group the contemporary at the end of the historicals, with books like Bridge to Terabithia (and it’s 1970’s references) toward the beginning of that section. What about classics, like Charlotte’s Web? Do I place it in the era it was written?

The stress!

But it’s a happy, first world problem to deal with. Now I just need to decide if I take the plunge. Photographic journal blog will follow if it comes to pass.

Week of Mondays

It’s only Wednesday, but it’s been a week of Mondays here. And I mean that in the best possible way. I’m one of those people who love Mondays.

Mondays are a fresh start.
Mondays are productive.
Mondays are inspiring.
Mondays are peaceful (usually, in part, because I rarely have anywhere to rush off to, which leaves me to…)
Mondays are pajama days (most of the time—see above.)

This week has qualified as a week of awesome because:
1. FORTITUDE, my debut novel, will be out in one year. (Hooray!) 100_6830.1

2. Europe (Favorite. Band. EVER.) is releasing their US tour dates this Friday. (Hello, bucket list item number one—see Europe live!)

3. The Shannara TV series (first season based on my favorite Terry Brooks novel, The Elfstones of Shannara) keeps releasing cast news and pre-filming has begun (in New Zealand, of course.) 100_6841

4. I finally got to see The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies.

5. I’m on schedule for finishing my edits of CORRODED, so I’m closer to sending it back into Query Land.

It’s been exciting in my little corner of the world. What bits of awesome are filling your week?

The Last Stored Release Day

The Last Stored by Sonia Poynter

Surge Anaiah Press

LastStored

Blurb:

After the sudden death of her parents, making it through the day is a
struggle for Amber Megan Peel. In the midst of her grief, an exquisite
bird perches on her garden fence and shows her visions of a vivid
landscape and a dark lord slouching upon a throne. She thinks the visions
are tied to her sorrow. But when a boy flies through her kitchen window to
tell her she’s the Last Stored, she wonders if she’s just lost her mind.

Cree of Din is tasked with one job: Bring Amber home. For seven years,
Cree has trained as her protector and it is the ultimate responsibility.
Failure means Amber’s certain death, and that’s not an option for Cree –
especially since he’s falling in love with her.

The Returning has begun. Now all Amber and Cree have to do is enter Tali,
a world of unimaginable splendor and equally unimaginable horror, and
defeat Lorthis. If they can’t, not only will Tali plunge into darkness,
but so will Earth.

Release Date:

January 6, 2015

Book Links:

Goodreads

Anaiah Press

Amazon

Excerpt:

Cree climbs onto the railing and extends his hand to me. “Your choice,
Amber, you can come or you can stay!” he yells over the roar of the
water.

“This is nuts. You expect me to jump?”

“Nuts? No, merely the door.” He beams with anticipation. He seems fine.
In fact, his eyes sparkle with the moon’s glow.

My heart skips. My choice. I had another choice. I grasp his hand and
crawl onto the railing. My feet slip, and I waver. Cree steadies me with
his hand. The water falls in torrents in front of me. Am I really about to
do this?

“You can’t go back once you enter. Are you ready? You can do this.”

He looks into the raging waters, then back at me. His cloak swirls
around him like Superman’s cape.

“Yes, I can do this!” My heartbeat bangs in my throat. I’m about to
jump off of Lovers Leap with a boy I don’t know, along with two little old
men who have vanished below my feet. This is crazy, but I’m supposed to do
it. Part of me knew it every time my mother and father looked over this
very railing. I’m at the door.

Cree squeezes my hand, nods, and we jump. He howls. The feeling of
dropping over a roller coaster comes on fast. The water rushes by, cold
and wet. I fall.

My chest tightens like I’ve had the wind knocked out of me. I choke and
cough, spitting out water. I see darkness, and I feel Cree’s hand holding
mine.

Then, a bright light shimmers and glows at my feet, reflecting upward.
The sound of the water fades. My lungs fill with sweet air. The light
expands, covering me. Wind swirls and holds me up. I no longer fall, but
glide upward. A light from above warms my face, and the aroma of fragrant
honey hangs on the air. We twist and turn, Cree’s cloak coils around him,
my own clothing flapping in the wind.

I giggle loudly and squeal like a child.

Cree crinkles his face and laughs along. The wind continues pushing us
through a tunnel. I lift my free hand and try to feel the mist forming
around us; it scatters with my touch, only to form again when I retreat.
We have increased our speed. Far above me, Dartlin and Fink’s feet come
into focus, and they’re whooping with joy.

Then we stop.

We stand in a brick wading pool a few inches deep. Stone replaces the
air, which moments before surrounded me. I take in a deep, fragrant
breath.

Cree continues to hold my hand. He looks at our fingers still entwined
and laughs. “You can let go.”

Book Trailer:


 


Rafflecopter giveaway code: USA only Ecopy of Pride

PrideSmall

 

a Rafflecopter giveaway

 

Author Bio:

Sonia Poynter grew up traipsing through the thick woods of Kentucky. The
magic of the forest made her want to write. Currently, she lives in the
sleepy community of Pittsboro, Indiana, with the love of her life and God
has blessed them both with three amazing kids.

Authors photo

Website

Twitter

Pinterest

Goodreads

Facebook

Publishing News

Last week there was some exciting news on the internet. Anaiah Press has acquired my young adult historical novel, FORTITUDE, and it’s set to be published January 12, 2016.

There’s much to do in the year ahead: revisions, line edits, cover reveal, and so on, but it’s a journey I’m most looking forward to. I have an editor and publicist, as well as a fabulous “family” at Anaiah to help me along. (Not to mention my family and friends who have championed me along all these years.)

A Merry Christmas to all, and a terrific New Year, too!

100_6765

The Chill in the Air

Christmas is about stories. The stories you make into memories with friends and family, those you read in scriptures to highlight the reason for the season, and the sometimes funny or heartwarming tales of winter that can be found in books of all sizes.

Rather than focusing on presents, for the weeks leading up to the special day my kids look forward to reading and hearing their beloved holiday books that we keep displayed under our tree. Each year they rediscover their favorites and enjoy new books in the collection.

100_6710

What is one of your special Christmas traditions?

Turbo Charged

Good movies are fun to watch. They can be inspiring, emotional, or even just entertaining. I tend to love movies that are all of the above—laughter, tears, and cheering on the characters are what make watching movies (and reading) enjoyable.

One movie I adore is Turbo.

Yes, the movie about a racing snail.

Turbo

What makes it work? Nostalgic (to me) So Cal flavor, the underlining theme of never giving up (ridicule, injuries, and mishaps can’t stop him), voice talents of Paul Giamatti and Samuel L. Jackson, plus the whacked-out soundtrack (it almost makes my iPod on Shuffle look tame). Almost.

Haven’t watched it? Then you’re missing lines like:

• Yeah, I’m crazy! What made you think I was sane?

• No dream is too big, and no dreamer is too small.

• What happens if you wake up tomorrow and your powers are gone?

Then I better make the most of today.

Now it’s time for me to “snail up!” and get back to edits.

What’s your favorite movie line?

It Happened, Again

Writing is tough. I spend hours writing a page or two, which will have to be edited and reworded in the future.

Writing is exhilarating. The feeling of freedom when my hands are almost moving as quick as my brain is fleeting, but so worth working toward.

The “fast draft” that I completed last month was a compilation of many of both types of moments. (Reminder: fast for me is six months, from conception to finished first draft. I’ve tried NaNoWriMo many times, but it’s not for me.) Upon beginning my edits, I notice I’m still making a lot of the same mistakes that have plagued me for decades.

Prime example: My main character is flat, and suffering from perfection syndrome, while my secondary characters are multi-faceted and promote more emotional attachment from early readers. The initial analysis for doing this is that I think of myself as a secondary character in life and relate better to those not in the spotlight, so I naturally attach myself as a writer to those on the sidelines. From a craft standpoint, I’m wondering if I have the story wrong. Maybe I need to switch my point-of-view (POV) character.

This happened with CORRODED. My main character, Mary, didn’t evoke a connection to many beta readers (and was even annoying to some) while every reader loved her sidekick Ben. (Yes, there’s a group of “Team Ben” readers out there.) What resulted, during something like the twentieth draft, CORRODED became a dual POV story, with alternating Ben and Mary chapters. And I have a sneaking suspicion that if I look at the manuscript again, it might become all about Ben. (Go ahead and squeal, ladies!)

100_6002

Rather than freezing while I berate myself for fouling up yet another story, I remind myself of this quote by William Faulkner, “Get it down. Take chances. It may be bad, but it’s the only way you can do anything really good.” So, back to the drawing board with THE UNRAVELING THREADS OF KYNDRA FIELDS.

In the meantime, do you think character POV issues are more often emotional or craft related?