World Autism Awareness Day

I find reading the easiest way to gather information. Those seeking to understand Autism have thousands of books to choose from. I personally enjoy autobiographies by those on the spectrum (like John Elder Robison) and novels because fiction is a great way to learn truths. Movies/documentaries featuring autism are a good resource as well. One of my favorite movies with an autistic character is “Molly” with Elizabeth Shue. That story changed how I thought about people with language challenges and helped me better understand the complexities of the human brain. (Yes, even though it’s fiction!)

My little book, Corroded, is celebrating a year in the wild. April is Autism Awareness/Acceptance Month and today is World Autism Awareness Day: the perfect time to read (or leave a review if you’ve already read it) for Corroded. Recommend it to a friend or family member you think might benefit from or enjoy the story. While what the character Ben goes through doesn’t describe every condition/issue individuals on the autism spectrum deal with, it shines a light on the different ways people experience the world. Knowledge leads to understanding. The world needs people who understand where those who are different from them are coming from.

Ordering links:

Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/Corroded-Carrie-Dalby-ebook/dp/B01DWH9NFU/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1460112918&sr=1-1

Amazon paperback: http://www.amazon.com/Corroded-Carrie-Dalby/dp/099733584X/ref=tmm_pap_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=1459964764&sr=1-1

Nook: http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/corroded-carrie-dalby/1123641953?ean=2940152960259

Barnes & Noble paperback: http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/corroded-carrie-dalby/1123641953?ean=9780997335842

Books-A-Million paperback: http://www.booksamillion.com/p/Corroded/Carrie-Dalby/9780997335842?id=6604570336082

Indie Bound paperback for purchasing a paperback from a local independent bookstore: http://www.indiebound.org/book/9780997335842

Kobo e-book: https://store.kobobooks.com/en-us/ebook/corroded

March Madness

There’s some catching up to do! This month’s been a productive time, and I still haven’t shared some fun news from February. Seeing how I labeled this post with the current month’s name, I’ll stick with the newest information this time around.

Last Saturday I crossed Mobile Bay and did a presentation for Baldwin Writers Group titled “Kid Lit 101”, in which I discussed what differentiates children book categories including board books, picture books, early readers, chapter books, middle grade, and young adult novels. It was my second time doing the presentation (the first was in December 2015 with my “home” crew at Mobile Writers Guild) and I enjoyed it just as much. If there’s one thing I can geek out about (other than my favorite musicians) it’s children’s literature. I converted at least one person to the Kid Lit side, so hooray!

Kid Lit 101

The first slide on my KID LIT 101 Power Point.

Then, on Monday four of my fabulously creative friends and I held a panel discussion on writing and illustrating with a local 4-H Arts group in an amazing meeting room in a contemporary art gallery downtown.

 

4-H presentation

Thanks to Candice and Robina for the picture.

After a short introduction we fielded questions ranging from research to plotting. It was energetic and fun, just like the original work created by Steven Moore for the event: The Inscribables. (Can you guess which one is me?)

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Original art by Steven Moore. Find him at http://www.grimtrojan.com

The past several days have been a great transition for me in my roll change from writer to author. I can’t imagine more supportive people to start my journey with than these two welcoming groups and my friends.

Bonus: I’ve kept my writing cap on, managing to add well over seven thousand words to my current project, plus completing final line edits on Corroded, out April 12, 2016. March/Spring is definitely going great here—I hope it’s shiny for you as well.

 

Shelfies

Since I’ve been in editing mode this year—and under deadline—many things around the house have fallen into states of disarray. Some of the most noticeable cluttered spaces are my bookshelves. After turning in the first round of content edits on my second novel I took a few days to organize my wall of books.

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But before I could tackle all those, I went to my other shelves and organized them so I could relocate some of the reference collection, among other things.

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Not too shabby.
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The Shannara books are out of the cabinet.

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Some of my favorite authors—and writing reference books—are located on the side of my standing desk.

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Many of my YA (and other) books are now located on the other side of my desk.

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Besides organizing I’m donating a box of MG-YA books to a friend who’s a first year middle school English teacher.

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But rather than totally streamlining, being the bibliophile that I am, I’ve already added fourteen new books to my collection so I now have some stacks in front of the stacks…

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I tried, really I did.

What’s your (book) weakness?

 

P.S. For those who subscribe to my newsletter, I skipped September because I hope to have some exciting news to share early this month, so be on the lookout.

 

A New Avenue

One aspect of being a professional writer is getting out of your comfort zone. Public speaking, business calls, and adding more outreach to an already public podium (you can find me on carriedalby.com, Facebook, Twitter, Goodreads, Pinterest…) have become part of my life.

Starting in July, you’ll also be able to hear from me directly in your inbox. I’m in the process of building a monthly newsletter, which might take the place of one blog post a month, but I’ll still post a few of those each month, too. I’ve added a nifty NEWSLETTER page on my dot com where you can go to sign-up for the mailing list, but you can also click HERE to join.

Literary News

Literary News

My literary newsletter is free, shareable, and will feature stories behind my novels, highlight what I’ve been reading (in case you don’t follow me on Goodreads), and other tidbits. Basically a shiny version of what you might find on all of my various sites, compacted into a easy to read e-mail. Sound good? Be sure to sign-up soon so you won’t miss an issue.

As always, if there is ever a topic or question you’d like me to cover, feel free to comment, send a message, etc. to let me know.

Bibliophile Problems

If you couldn’t tell from my previous posts, I’m a book girl. There are a lot of books in my house. I’m talking more than dozens, more than hundreds, probably a couple thousand. I’ve never counted them all—that would mean math, and me and numbers don’t always get along.

This afternoon, after answering yet another a post on a homeschool page for recommendations for books set in a specific time period (happens regularly, and as a children’s literature connoisseur with a passion for historicals, I have to respond.) This time, it was a call for Civil War books. So, after going to my “favorite author” shelf in the hall, I returned to my desk area to look over my general middle grade collection for more titles. But then I remembered my middle child’s quest for all things military, and that I’ve allowed him to adopt many of my middle grade novels dealing with war, so I had to go check the bookcase in his room.

I circled all around the house to gather information I could have grouped together. What’s a bibliophile to do?

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I’m seriously contemplating putting all my books in chronological order. Even though that would mean splitting up the Katherine Paterson, Avi, Richard Peck, and Laurie Halse Anderson novels, I think at this point in my life (hello, homeschool!) it would be beneficial. But then I’d have to worry about the fantasy, science fiction, and contemporary… where would they all fit? Group the contemporary at the end of the historicals, with books like Bridge to Terabithia (and it’s 1970’s references) toward the beginning of that section. What about classics, like Charlotte’s Web? Do I place it in the era it was written?

The stress!

But it’s a happy, first world problem to deal with. Now I just need to decide if I take the plunge. Photographic journal blog will follow if it comes to pass.

Halfway There

I’m halfway through my reading goal for the year. I finished the fiftieth book out of my one hundred book challenge. Out of those fifty, I currently have thirty books in my possession. Two of my nonfiction books and two fiction are out on loan, one title I borrowed from a friend, I read five books on my Nook, and the other ten were from the local library. Since the last book I finished (ONE NATION: WHAT WE CAN ALL DO TO SAVE AMERICA’S FUTURE by Ben Carson, MD) is a loaner to me from a friend, it all balances out.

Here are some pictures, in chronological order from oldest to newest read. (A couple of these were rereads, but most were first timers.) To see my complete list, check out my goodreads shelves.

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I read diverse books: from genres to subject matter to authors. The first half of the year I covered all types of fiction, from chapter books to adult, plus a graphic novel and poetry collection. Non-fiction featuring current events, education, self-help, and biography. Authors and characters with medical issues, from all walks of life, and of a variety of ethnic backgrounds—I read it all.

What have you been reading?