Three Confessions

Confession #1: I have a lot of books.
Confession #2: I have a lot of bookshelves (but I could always use more.)
Confession #3: I keep my most treasured books behind closed doors.

I first started hiding my books after my eldest child started to “wear out” his own books. Lift-the-flap books with no flaps to lift. Using books as bridges, literally walking on them across the floor, was a favorite activity. And with his books, spines were optional. I feared for my beloved books, as well as my husband’s collection.

Our favorite books went from the top shelves—he could scale the bookshelves—to high levels inside cabinets. I could hear the cabinet doors opening, but I didn’t always hear him at the bookcases until it was too late.

In the past three years that I’ve been homeschooling, the book population has hit overdrive.

The main wall of books--about a third of what we have.

The main wall of books–about a third of what we have.

The non-fiction area has doubled and the sum of the middle grade novels that my oldest son reads every night is greater than anything I ever held as the lone reader of them. My youngest has a two shelf bookcase of picture books and all things pink while the middle child hoards The Magic Tree House and military history.
Last year I wrote a post about my oldest turning into a reader and he hasn’t slowed down. The other night, when he came looking for another book amid the post holiday explosion, I realized he hasn’t read Bridge to Terabithia or A Wrinkle in Time. All of the Katherine Paterson, Madeleine L’Engle, Laurie Halse Anderson, Terry Brooks, and Orson Scott Card books are behind closed doors. Not to mention Narnia, Green Gables, Hogwarts, and The Shire.
Parenting fail!
So, my goal this month—hopefully this week—is to get these books out and into circulation among my household. No more restricted section in the family library. I’ll document this effort with photos, so stayed tuned!

So Much to Read, So Little Time

Most of my down time lately has been spent reading. Studying is more like it. Up to my ears in non-fiction reading. Here’s a sampling of titles, all from the local library:
Secret Lives of Boys: Inside the Raw Emotional World of Male Teens by Malina Saval *Graphic language at times—the first chapter has it the heaviest.* Over-all, a fascinating read. Boys are a lot like girls when it comes to worries/fears.
Exiting Nirvana : A Daughter’s Life with Autism by Clara Claiborne Park It’s refreshing to find a book dealing with an older child on the spectrum. And one that’s artistically inclined, like my son. Since I have so many informative books to read right now, I’m using this one as my light/nighttime reading. As interesting as it is, I look forward to some fluff.
1001 Great Ideas for Teaching and Raising Children with Autism or Asperger’s by Ellen Notbohm and Veronica Zysk Lots of good ideas: some old, some new. Taking notes…
The Everything Homeschooling Book by Sherri Linsenbach Need I say more?
On a good—possibly pathetic—note, I’ve written over twelve chapters of Corroded. Eleven of those (89 pages) have been through the mill in the awesome critique group I’m in. Thank you, QuillMasters! My main character is based on me as a teen, but amplified. The more she stretches her limits, the more fun (and harder!) it is to write. It’s almost like reliving high school, thinking about all the “what ifs” and if I had that chance, would I have been brave (or stupid) enough to do or say something… For the most part the answer is no. And, an enormous NO for ever wanting to actually go back and live through it again.
Speaking of me as a teen: back by popular demand (well, all four people who voted wanted to see more) is a random poem from a seventeen year old me.
Lost
Crashing waves against the sand. The tempest whirls in my head. A soul dragged down by Satan’s grasp Has left the world victim of the sacrifice.