The Blogger Recognition Award

I’m deep in the first-drafting trenches so I’m skipping the play along, but wanted to share Candice’s awesome blog with my readers.

candice marley conner

blogger-recognition-award

Middle grade writer and recommender-extraordinaire of books, Laura tagged me in this fun blogging event. Here are the rules:

  1. Thank the blogger who nominated you and provide a link to their blog.
  2. Write a post to show your award.
  3. Give a brief story of how your blog started.
  4. Give two pieces of advice to new bloggers.
  5. Select other bloggers you want to give this award to.
  6. Comment on each blog and let them know you have nominated them & provide the link to the post you created.

Now onto the fun stuff!

The story of how I started my blog.

I’m pretty new to the blogging world. My first post was written on May 26th, 2016, so I’m just a smidge over a year old.

1st blog post announcement

I started the blog because I wanted another way to connect–not only writing and mothering and magically things–but to connect those things with other folks. I had…

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R – Relationships

Anaiah Press

Author Carrie Dalby is back here with us again. Today she’s talking about relationships…

R

When I came up with this topic, I immediately thought of relationships between characters. But as a writer, relationships are much larger than what is in the book. Yes, you’re an artist creating stories, but you are also a professional and working with others is an important part of that. Let’s break it down.

As a writer, you’re in control (for the most part—sometimes the characters don’t do what you expect them to) for the relationships on the pages of the story. You need to make sure your characters interact with their family, friends, environment, etc. in a consistent manner—even if that means people at school/work/social settings see a different side of the character than the people at home. Whatever the character’s attitude is (even if it changes over the course of the book) needs…

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H – Historical Fiction: Charting Your Course

A little something I wrote for the publishing company of my young adult novels during their A to Z blog month.

Anaiah Press

Today’s post is courtesy of Carrie Dalby, author of Corroded and Fortitude.

H

If you had asked me twenty-five, twenty, or even ten years ago what I thought I’d be doing, I never would have dreamed of saying “writing historical fiction.” Writing? Yes. Historical? No. While I enjoyed writing research papers in school, I never enjoyed history class. There were too many dates to memorizes, the textbooks were dry. And I failed my A.P. U.S. History test.

The two main things you need to write historical fiction are the ability to research and a passion for the subject matter. I knew how to research and acquired a love of history as an adult by reading historical novels—mostly middle grade, but some young adult and adult titles as well. Well researched books by Laurie Halse Anderson, Avi, Richard Peck, and countless Newbery winners captivated me. The time periods that once were…

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Finding Faith in Young Adult Literature, a Guest post by Carrie Dalby

One of the stops on my blog tour.
See more links at https://anaiahpress.wordpress.com/2016/03/01/follow-the-corroded-blog-tour/

Anaiah Press

Corroded-banner

Fifteen-year- old Mary Lou Weber is suffocating in her sister’s shadow. Though she struggles to break into the light and claim her own identity—and the attention of the cutest guy in school—something always seems to pull her right back down into the role of Barbara’s little sister.
Down the street lives seventeen-year- old Ben Thomas, a lonely introvert who is captive to a sensory condition that makes it nearly impossible for him to stand in sunlight, much less talk to people whom he thinks could never understand his difficulties.
A new year kindles the friendship between a guy who pushes away the world and the girl who’s striving to find her place in it. Can the relationship help Mary and Ben find balance in a world that frequently seems too much to handle?

Available right now!

Goodreads – Amazon – B&N – Smashwords   

About Carrie:CarrieDalby

Born and raised in California, Carrie Dalby has lived in…

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Heir of Koradin Blog Tour

As mentioned previously, now that I’m part of the Anaiah Press family, I’ll be featuring some of their Surge (young adult) imprint books. I’m in the process of reading the first book in the Chasmaria series, and it’s a great read. Grit

This month, welcomed the second book of Chasmaria, and here’s what going on with that…

HeirofKoradin
Blurb:
Dagger of Willow and Strike has waited a lifetime to return to the village of his birth. He’s been promised the throne of Koradin, but getting captured by his treacherous sire wasn’t part of the plan. Dagger needs a miracle to turn his childhood dreams into reality—And Grit of Berth and Stone might be that miracle.
Unfortunately for him, Grit’s stuck in the rival village of Thresh, and she’s in way over her head. Having bluffed her way into commanding an army of incompetents, she’s useless to Dagger if her new recruits don’t learn the right end of a sword. To make matters worse, Dagger’s sire seeks Grit’s life, and there’s no telling when he’ll return to Thresh to finish what he started when he killed her dame.
But freedom calls through shifting alliances, and neither Dagger’s disillusionment nor Grit’s doubt can keep the armies of Koradin and Thresh from war.

Release Date: August 4, 2015

Book Links:
Anaiah Press: http://www.anaiahpress.com/Koradin.html

Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B013C7TWLK

B&N: http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/grit-of-berth-and-stone-lisa-dunn/1121283483?ean=9780996129756

iBooks: https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/grit-of-berth-and-stone/id970834995?mt=11
Smashwords: https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/566000

Excerpt: First chapter available on our website http://www.anaiahpress.com/Koradin.html

ALSO READ The First Book of Chasmaria: Grit of Berth and Stone by Lisa Dunn
http://www.anaiahpress.com/Grit.html

Review Snippets from Book 1: Grit of Berth and Stone:
“Grit does not fit into any of our modern stereotypes and I love that.”
“ Grit’s world is well-crafted and revealed to the reader through the story telling with just enough details to understand the world and story and to keep you intrigued and guessing about what is coming next.”
“This book will definitely keep your attention and your thoughts long after you’ve finished.”

Book Trailer: https://youtu.be/Seq-Fg7M0l4

DON’T MISS!
End of Tour Author Facebook Q&A: Thursday, August 27, 9-10 p.m. EST
https://www.facebook.com/events/1666980863546266/

Rafflecopter giveaway code: Anaiah Press will giveaway one ecopy of Grit of Berth and Stone. Enter via the Rafflecopter below:
EMBED CODE: a Rafflecopter giveaway

or Link: http://www.rafflecopter.com/rafl/display/d3e9359421/?

Author Bio:
As a child, Lisa Dunn fell asleep to her father’s fanciful bedtime tales and played with her own stories during the daylight hours. She now resides in a small southern town with her husband and four children. Local librarians thank her for their job security.

Lisa Dunn-Author Photo
Website: http://waitingforaname.wordpress.com/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/ScouterWife
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/authorlisadunn?fref=nf
Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/21086727-lisa-dunn

Bibliophile Problems

If you couldn’t tell from my previous posts, I’m a book girl. There are a lot of books in my house. I’m talking more than dozens, more than hundreds, probably a couple thousand. I’ve never counted them all—that would mean math, and me and numbers don’t always get along.

This afternoon, after answering yet another a post on a homeschool page for recommendations for books set in a specific time period (happens regularly, and as a children’s literature connoisseur with a passion for historicals, I have to respond.) This time, it was a call for Civil War books. So, after going to my “favorite author” shelf in the hall, I returned to my desk area to look over my general middle grade collection for more titles. But then I remembered my middle child’s quest for all things military, and that I’ve allowed him to adopt many of my middle grade novels dealing with war, so I had to go check the bookcase in his room.

I circled all around the house to gather information I could have grouped together. What’s a bibliophile to do?

Book project! 100_6855

I’m seriously contemplating putting all my books in chronological order. Even though that would mean splitting up the Katherine Paterson, Avi, Richard Peck, and Laurie Halse Anderson novels, I think at this point in my life (hello, homeschool!) it would be beneficial. But then I’d have to worry about the fantasy, science fiction, and contemporary… where would they all fit? Group the contemporary at the end of the historicals, with books like Bridge to Terabithia (and it’s 1970’s references) toward the beginning of that section. What about classics, like Charlotte’s Web? Do I place it in the era it was written?

The stress!

But it’s a happy, first world problem to deal with. Now I just need to decide if I take the plunge. Photographic journal blog will follow if it comes to pass.